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LA - Louisiana

Portland
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MA - Maine

Baltimore
Columbia
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Germantown
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North Bethesda

MY - Maryland

Boston
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MS - Massachusetts

Minneapolis
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MN - Minnesota

Jackson
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Greenwood
Laurel

MS - Mississippi

 

 

Massage Therapy Schools

Massage therapy is a fast-growing profession that will grow by 20% between 2006 and 2016. Massage therapists first attend a massage therapy school or program in order to pass a licensing exam in the state where they live so that they can practice in the field. Massage therapy schools vary greatly in their curriculum, their accreditation, and their requirements, so it's important to carefully research a school or a program before applying.

Curriculum at a Massage Therapy School

The length of a massage therapy training program varies depending on whether the student chooses a full-time program or chooses to attend a part-time, evening program. Most full-time programs take one to two years, while part-time programs take two or even three years. There are some programs that only focus on one type of massage and last just a few weeks, but these programs are not as highly regarded, may not lead to full licensure, and are not recommended for anyone wishing to make massage therapy into a career.

Typical classroom courses include basic anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology, as well as courses in various types of massage. In addition to classroom learning, all massage therapy schools require that students spend a significant amount of time practicing massage techniques on one another or on clients who come to the school for an inexpensive massage.

 

Different Types of Massage Therapy

The types of massage most often taught at massage therapy schools include:

NMT, or Neuromuscular Therapy. This type of massage seeks to address underlying causes of pain through soft tissue manipulation. NMT is considered a more scientific approach to massage therapy, and is a popular form of massage therapy today.
Swedish Massage. Swedish massage is the most widely practiced type of massage, and is also one of the oldest forms of massage therapy practiced professionally in the United States.
Shiatsu Massage. Shiatsu is similar to acupuncture in that it focuses on normalizing the energy throughout the body by using certain pressure points to increase blood flow and relax muscle tension.
Spa-oriented massage therapies. As spas become a more important segment of the massage therapy job market, massage therapy schools are responding by including spa-oriented training within their programs. For example, body wraps, body masques, aromatherapy, and hydrotherapy are being taught at some massage therapy schools.

These are just a few of the different types of massage, also known as “modalities”, taught in massage therapy schools. Some schools may not have one or more of the types of massage listed above, while other schools may offer far more modalities, such as Thai massage, deep tissue massage, hot stone massage, sports massage, and more.

Because most massage therapists are self-employed (a total of 64% of massage therapists), good massage therapy schools also teach the basics of business management and marketing to help prepare new grads for running their own business.

 

Finding a Job as a New Massage Therapist

It is relatively easy to find a job as a new grad, because the field of massage therapy is growing so quickly. As previously mentioned, 64% of massage therapists are self-employed, so for some therapists, finding a job is as simple as listing their name in the Yellow Pages and starting to find clients. Other massage therapists work as independent contractors at spas or resorts, so while technically they are still self-employed, they must interview with the spa in order to gain the position.

An average yearly salary for a massage therapist is around $30,000. This includes tips; for massage therapists working in spas or resorts, as much as 15 – 20% of their income comes from tips.

After graduating from a massage therapy school, passing the licensing exam, and finding a job, a massage therapist's education is not necessarily over. Most massage therapists take continuing education classes to further their career and increase their knowledge. Depending upon the license the massage therapist holds, taking continuing education courses are sometimes necessary in order to maintain a license.

 

 

 

 

Massage Therapy Trainer Certification Courses, Schools and Exams - Massage Therapy Colleges - Programs - Classes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massage Therapist Training Acadamy - Education

NCBTMB Certification

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massage Therapy - Massage Therapy Schools & Training

An Overview of Massage Therapy - Massage Therapy & Prostitution

High Paying Therapist Jobs - Online EDU For Massage Therapist

Licensure and Examination - Continuing Education

Background Checks & Criminal History